1. as-seenon-tv:

blondiesandbrownies:

ohsupuniverse:

summerplease:

Is it just me, or does this get faster and faster the longer I look at it?

it DEFINITELY gets faster.

Cool story: your brain takes so much longer to process this the first time you watch it, but as you continue watching it, your memory retains more and more of the scene. Thus, your brain can process it quicker and knows what to expect.

I’m reblogging this because that comment made me think

    as-seenon-tv:

    blondiesandbrownies:

    ohsupuniverse:

    summerplease:

    Is it just me, or does this get faster and faster the longer I look at it?

    it DEFINITELY gets faster.

    Cool story: your brain takes so much longer to process this the first time you watch it, but as you continue watching it, your memory retains more and more of the scene. Thus, your brain can process it quicker and knows what to expect.

    I’m reblogging this because that comment made me think

  2. thatsmysecret:


“Men need to objectify and conquer. They see what they want to see. Women, however, can see into the soul of a person.”

Genius.

    thatsmysecret:

    Men need to objectify and conquer. They see what they want to see. Women, however, can see into the soul of a person.

    Genius.

    (Source: trolltina)

  3. herclothesfalloff:

moscarelli:

Bye Felicia

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!
Hey, it was that or eat the head after sex, so —-

    herclothesfalloff:

    moscarelli:

    Bye Felicia

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

    Hey, it was that or eat the head after sex, so —-

    (Source: nostalgicpatter)

  4. 
"Animals are gentle, and kind."
In Acquiring Genomes: A Theory of the Origins of Species, biologist Lynn Margulis argued later that symbiogenesis is a primary force in evolution. According to her theory, acquisition and accumulation of random mutations are not sufficient to explain how inherited variations occur; rather, new organelles, bodies, organs, and species arise from symbiogenesis. Whereas the classical interpretation of evolution (the modern evolutionary synthesis) emphasizes competition as the main force behind evolution, Margulis emphasizes cooperation. She argues that bacteria along with other microorganisms helped create the conditions that we require for life, such as oxygen.
Margulis believes that these microorganisms make up a major component in Earth’s biomass and that they are the reason current conditions on earth are maintained. She also believes that the DNA in the cytoplasm of animal, plant, fungal and protist cells, rather than resulting from mutations, resulted from genes from bacteria that became organelles. She claimed that bacteria are able to exchange genes more quickly and more easily, and because of this, they are more versatile, which is why life was able to evolve so quickly.

    "Animals are gentle, and kind."

    In Acquiring Genomes: A Theory of the Origins of Species, biologist Lynn Margulis argued later that symbiogenesis is a primary force in evolution. According to her theory, acquisition and accumulation of random mutations are not sufficient to explain how inherited variations occur; rather, new organelles, bodies, organs, and species arise from symbiogenesis. Whereas the classical interpretation of evolution (the modern evolutionary synthesis) emphasizes competition as the main force behind evolution, Margulis emphasizes cooperation. She argues that bacteria along with other microorganisms helped create the conditions that we require for life, such as oxygen.

    Margulis believes that these microorganisms make up a major component in Earth’s biomass and that they are the reason current conditions on earth are maintained. She also believes that the DNA in the cytoplasm of animal, plant, fungal and protist cells, rather than resulting from mutations, resulted from genes from bacteria that became organelles. She claimed that bacteria are able to exchange genes more quickly and more easily, and because of this, they are more versatile, which is why life was able to evolve so quickly.

  5. kenobi-wan-obi:


Bad-Ass Female Scientists: Lynn Margulis

"
I don’t consider my ideas controversial. I consider them right."
Biologist Lynn Margulis died on November 22nd. She stood out from her colleagues in that she would have extended evolutionary studies nearly four billion years back in time. Her major work was in cell evolution, in which the great event was the appearance of the eukaryotic, or nucleated, cell — the cell upon which all larger life-forms are based. Nearly forty-five years ago, she argued for its symbiotic origin: that it arose by associations of different kinds of bacteria. Her ideas were generally either ignored or ridiculed when she first proposed them; symbiosis in cell evolution is now considered one of the great scientific breakthroughs.
Margulis was also a champion of the Gaia hypothesis, an idea developed in the 1970s by the free lance British atmospheric chemist James E. Lovelock. The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere and surface sediments of the planet Earth form a self- regulating physiological system — Earth’s surface is alive. The strong version of the hypothesis, which has been widely criticized by the biological establishment, holds that the earth itself is a self-regulating organism; Margulis subscribed to a weaker version, seeing the planet as an integrated self- regulating ecosystem. She was criticized for succumbing to what George Williams called the “God-is good” syndrome, as evidenced by her adoption of metaphors of symbiosis in nature. She was, in turn, an outspoken critic of mainstream evolutionary biologists for what she saw as a failure to adequately consider the importance of chemistry and microbiology in evolution.
I first met her in the late 80’s and in 1994 interviewed her for my book The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution (1995). Below, in remembrance, please see her chapter, “Gaia is a Tough Bitch”. One of the compelling features of The Third Culture was that I invited each of the participants to comment about the others. In this regard, the end of the following chapter has comments on Margulis and her work by Daniel C. Dennett, the late George C. Williams, W. Daniel Hillis, Lee Smolin, Marvin Minsky, Richard Dawkins, and the late Francisco Varela. Interesting stuff.
As I wrote in the introduction to the first part of the book (Part I: The Evolutionary Idea): “The principal debates are concerned with the mechanism of speciation; whether natural selection operates at the level of the gene, the organism, or the species, or all three; and also with the relative importance of other factors, such as natural catastrophes.” These very public debates were concerned with ideas represented by George C. Williams and Richard Dawkins on one side and Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge on the other side. Not for Lynn Margulis. All the above scientists were wrong because evolutionary studies needed to begin four billion years back in time. And she was not shy about expressing her opinions. Her in-your-face, take-no-prisoners stance was pugnacious and tenacious. She was impossible. She was wonderful. — John Brockman
"Gaia is a tough bitch." L. Margulis

    kenobi-wan-obi:

    Bad-Ass Female Scientists: Lynn Margulis

    "
I don’t consider my ideas controversial. I consider them right."

    Biologist Lynn Margulis died on November 22nd. She stood out from her colleagues in that she would have extended evolutionary studies nearly four billion years back in time. Her major work was in cell evolution, in which the great event was the appearance of the eukaryotic, or nucleated, cell — the cell upon which all larger life-forms are based. Nearly forty-five years ago, she argued for its symbiotic origin: that it arose by associations of different kinds of bacteria. Her ideas were generally either ignored or ridiculed when she first proposed them; symbiosis in cell evolution is now considered one of the great scientific breakthroughs.

    Margulis was also a champion of the Gaia hypothesis, an idea developed in the 1970s by the free lance British atmospheric chemist James E. Lovelock. The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere and surface sediments of the planet Earth form a self- regulating physiological system — Earth’s surface is alive. The strong version of the hypothesis, which has been widely criticized by the biological establishment, holds that the earth itself is a self-regulating organism; Margulis subscribed to a weaker version, seeing the planet as an integrated self- regulating ecosystem. She was criticized for succumbing to what George Williams called the “God-is good” syndrome, as evidenced by her adoption of metaphors of symbiosis in nature. She was, in turn, an outspoken critic of mainstream evolutionary biologists for what she saw as a failure to adequately consider the importance of chemistry and microbiology in evolution.

    I first met her in the late 80’s and in 1994 interviewed her for my book The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution (1995). Below, in remembrance, please see her chapter, “Gaia is a Tough Bitch”. One of the compelling features of The Third Culture was that I invited each of the participants to comment about the others. In this regard, the end of the following chapter has comments on Margulis and her work by Daniel C. Dennett, the late George C. Williams, W. Daniel Hillis, Lee Smolin, Marvin Minsky, Richard Dawkins, and the late Francisco Varela. Interesting stuff.

    As I wrote in the introduction to the first part of the book (Part I: The Evolutionary Idea): “The principal debates are concerned with the mechanism of speciation; whether natural selection operates at the level of the gene, the organism, or the species, or all three; and also with the relative importance of other factors, such as natural catastrophes.” These very public debates were concerned with ideas represented by George C. Williams and Richard Dawkins on one side and Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge on the other side. Not for Lynn Margulis. All the above scientists were wrong because evolutionary studies needed to begin four billion years back in time. And she was not shy about expressing her opinions. Her in-your-face, take-no-prisoners stance was pugnacious and tenacious. She was impossible. She was wonderful. — John Brockman

    "Gaia is a tough bitch." L. Margulis

  6. (Source: liftinmotivation)

  7. http://buttschmidts.tumblr.com/post/81611110562/before-you-start-feeling-like-a-piece-of-shit →

    buttschmidts:

    Before you start feeling like a piece of shit because you have a disorder, just remember that

    • Albert Einstein had depression and he was the smartest man to ever live.
    • Joan of Arc was speculated to be epileptic and schizophrenic and she led an entire ARMY.
    • Stephen Hawking has an MND and…

  8. flyartproductions:

That’s why you wanna have no sex, why you wanna protest, why you wanna fight for your right
Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII (1854), Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres / Proud of You, Drake feat. Nicki Minaj

    flyartproductions:

    That’s why you wanna have no sex, why you wanna protest, why you wanna fight for your right

    Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII (1854), Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres / Proud of You, Drake feat. Nicki Minaj

  9. At the end of the day, let there be no excuses, no explanations, no regrets.

    — ― Steve Maraboli (via psych-quotes)

  10. (Source: 18month-s)